Last edited by Tygosar
Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of effects of black and Hispanic television portrayals on white youths found in the catalog.

effects of black and Hispanic television portrayals on white youths

Elsa E. Ortega

effects of black and Hispanic television portrayals on white youths

by Elsa E. Ortega

  • 338 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Minorities on television.,
  • Television and youth.,
  • Television -- Psychological aspects.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Elsa E. Ortega.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 72 leaves, bound ;
    Number of Pages72
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16839537M

    Hispanic/Latino characters are more likely than non-Hispanic white characters to possess lower status occupations, such as domestic workers, or be involved in drug related crimes. Hispanic and Latina women, similarly, are typically portrayed as lazy, verbally aggressive, and lacking work ethic. [9].   These intergenerational effects are blatantly non-meritocratic. and turn off the television sets and eradicate the slander that says a black youth with a book is acting white.

    This book critically analyzes the portrayals of Black women in current reality television. Audiences are presented with a multitude of images of Black women fighting, arguing, and cursing at one another in this manufactured world of reality television.4/5(1). A study was designed to examine the effects of positive portrayals of black television characters on black children's racial attitudes, self-perception, and racial identification. Data were collected from black children (N=60) attending 1st and 2nd grades. Children were exposed to one of .

      CYNDI FRISBY is a nationally-recognized authority on media portrayals of minorities, athletes, women and teens. Frisby studies how media messages contribute toward creating or maintaining stereotypes and biases against minorities, athletes, women and teens. Among other topics, she has investigated the sources of American viewers’ fascination with reality television and the effects . identity, racial socialization, body image and self-esteem for to year-old Black youth. Focus groups were administered to learn about how Black youth interpret Black media images and whether they could identify negative stereotype messages. Next, survey data was collected to pilot the Black .


Share this book
You might also like
Ozark-Ouachita highlands assessment

Ozark-Ouachita highlands assessment

Consumer credit in the United States

Consumer credit in the United States

Dolce agonia

Dolce agonia

Localizing and transnationalizing contentious politics

Localizing and transnationalizing contentious politics

Map Pack 9.0

Map Pack 9.0

New cities in America

New cities in America

Oklahoma pesticide applicators law rules and regulations.

Oklahoma pesticide applicators law rules and regulations.

Historical sketch of the First Presbyterian Church of Norristown, Pa.

Historical sketch of the First Presbyterian Church of Norristown, Pa.

housing benefit bungle.

housing benefit bungle.

Partnerships in providing customer service

Partnerships in providing customer service

Superalloys

Superalloys

World salmon culture

World salmon culture

Assorted War

Assorted War

Good works and predestination according to Thomas of Strassburg.

Good works and predestination according to Thomas of Strassburg.

Science Lecture Room

Science Lecture Room

Inventors of our world.

Inventors of our world.

Windsor

Windsor

Effects of black and Hispanic television portrayals on white youths by Elsa E. Ortega Download PDF EPUB FB2

Quantity of Television Portrayals. Few depictions of blacks were offered on primetime television before the s (Wilson, Gutierrez, & Chao, ).Quantitative content analyses of TV programming from the s reveal that blacks constituted a mere 6% of characters (Greenberg & Brand, ), despite representing approximately 12% of the US population at the time (US Census Briefs, Cited by: 1.

Huang () noticed that Black television characters had similar character-istics as their White television counterparts. EFFECTS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PORTRAYALS IN THE MEDIA Studies dealing with television portrayals of African Americans have also looked at the effects of viewing these images (e.g., Ford, ).

Ford. A content analysis of magazine advertisements from and is performed to examine advertising portrayals of African, Hispanic, and Asian Americans. The issues investigated are the frequency of portrayal of minority groups, the representation of groups in technical versus nontechnical product categories, and the settings and relationships Cited by: Brown was replayed outside of print media on television and across social media as instance, HBOtalkshow hostBillMaher commented, “I’msorry,but Portrayals of racial and ethnic minority victims of police violence like × 2 (Race of Victim: Black or White) × 2 (Race of Shooter: Black or White) between-subjects design.

Victim Cited by:   In journalism, decision makers are largely white. A study by the Radio Television Digital News Association and Hofstra University showed Author: Joyannreid. Support for this assumption has been provided by The Annenberg School of Cultural Communicators Project which found that between the years of to only % of primetime television characters were Hispanic The significance of this is that this figure is still significantly behind other minorities such as the African American.

Since its inception as an integral part of American life in the s, television has both reflected and nurtured cultural mores and values. From the escapist dramas of the s, which consciously avoided controversial issues and glossed over life’s harsher realities in favor of an idealized portrayal, to the copious reality TV shows in recent years, on which participants discuss even the.

to media exposure. The research also recognizes "identifier" word patterns using "black" and "white". The research offers a conclusion, that on average, “black” is used three times, more in news reporting than "white".

The over usage of the word “black” becomes a racial micro. The book tells the story of a mixed girl, who was raised to think of herself as white, but whose light-brown skin comes with the expectation that she’ll “act Black” when she’s suddenly.

Sexual content is highly prevalent in traditional media, and portrayals rarely depict the responsibilities and risks (eg, condom use, pregnancy) associated with sexual activity.

Exposure to such content is linked with shifts in attitudes about sex and gender, earlier progression to sexual activity, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infection among adolescents. However, little information is. Paying select attention to signs and images produced and presented by television media, this essay will analyze the portrayal of Black culture on American television and how it has been constructed based on the system of representation controlled and influenced by White ideologies of the “Other”.

As with Asians, black characters often weren't played by black people in the early days of Hollywood. In fact, they barely appeared at all, except as caricatures played by white actors in blackface.

Based on questionnaire responses from undergraduate students, this study sought to examine specific perceptions (i.e., occupational roles, negative personality characteristics, low achieving status, and positive stereotypes) of African American portrayals on television.

Results revealed that television viewers perceive the occupational roles and personality characteristics that African. White females were most frequently victims. Music videos may be reinforcing false stereotypes of aggressive black males and victimized white females.

These observations raise concern for the effect of music videos on adolescents’ normative expectations about conflict resolution, race, and male-female relationships. (Rich et al., ). These portrayals, constantly reinforced in print media, on television, the internet, fiction shows, print advertising and video games, shape public views of and attitudes toward men of color.

In the Michigan State University study covering fictional programming over three TV seasons, Greenberg and Baptista-Fernandez found that "Hispanic characters are mostly males, of dark complexion, with dark hair, most often with heavy accents. Women are absent and insignificant," (Latin Looks: Images of Latinas and Latinos in the US.

Media, pg. The way we speak about these boys is stuck, quite firmly, in deficit-mode -- we point out homicide rates, dropout rates, incarceration rates, and a litany of other statistics that feed into a grim picture. This gets coupled with nonstop media accounts of Black youth mostly as criminals, sometimes as victims, but almost never as heroes.

The black Hispanics’ asthma prevalence estimates (%) was different from both white Hispanic (%) and non-Hispanic black people (%), with black Hispanics more likely to have asthma than both racial/ethnic groups. Media content may also lead to depression more directly.

Cultural messages transmitted through media may affect other behaviors related to mental health such as eating disorders and aggressive behavior, 18, 19 and media exposure may similarly contribute to development of depression through reinforcement of depressogenic cognitions.

20 For example, certain electronic media exposures are. A one week sample of prime time television ( p.m.) for ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC was constructed to represent broadcast entertainment programming for In a systematic content analysis/ the frequencies and attributes of ethnic minority and majority characters were documented, with particular attention to Latinos and their interactions with.

Start studying Media Effects Exam 2 - Sample Questions. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

Your book outlined several "high risk" contexts that can encourage aggressive attitudes and behaviors, especially in children. Long-term exposure to stereotypical portrayals of Blacks has been shown to.A study of New Jersey juvenile court records for the years released by WNYC late in found that black and Latino offenders comprised almost 90% of juveniles tried as adults ( black youths, Latino out of a total of 1, juveniles tried as adults during the five-year period, thereby black/Hispanic teens represented % of.The results show that Hispanic females are the most likely to be influenced, followed by White females.

Black females reported no influence. With respect to adolescent boys, only a few reported.